Thank you for joining us at the third annual Northwest Wilderness Medicine Conference, presented by medical student leadership from WA and OR. We wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for you. We have an amazing and full schedule, so enjoy!

Scroll down below for the schedule and lecture descriptions, or click here for the PDF copy of our program.


FRIDAY

4pm-7pm

Check-In / Pizza Reception, Fanning Hall

7pm-8pm

Introduction to Wilderness Medicine, Tyler Nielsen, Fanning Hall

8pm-8:30pm

Overview of Conference, Fanning Hall

8:30pm

Beers & Splints / Friday Night Social, Fanning Hall


SATURDAY

7am-8am

Breakfast, Fanning Hall

8am-9am

Adaptation to Hypoxia, Emily Johnston, Fanning Hall

Glacier Travel, Stewart Decker, Laurel Lodge

Introduction to Basic Wilderness Medicine Principles and Practice, Bill Hatch, Cy Lodge

9am-10am

Climbing Medicine, J. Pearce Beissinger, Fanning Hall

Medical Care for Common Ski Injuries, Carlton Heine, Laurel Lodge

Cold Related Injuries, Derrick Sorweide, Cy Lodge

10am-11am

High Altitude Medicine, Andrew Luks, Fanning Hall

Survivor Personalities and Resiliency, Stewart Decker, Laurel Lodge

West Coast Snake Envenomations: From Fangs to Fibrin to Fangs, Brittany Arnold, Cy Lodge

11am-12pm

Landing Zone Safety Training, Holly Ilg, Fanning Hall

Mass Casualty Incident in the Wilderness, Dwight Smith, Laurel Lodge

ALS in the Backcountry, CJ Svela, Cy Lodge

12pm-1pm

Lunch, Fanning Hall

1pm-2pm

Hypothermia Recognition, Physiology, and Management, Anna Condino, Fanning Hall

2pm-4pm

Team A: Assessing and Moving the Injured Patient Laurel Lodge

Team B: Assessing and Moving the Injured Patient Cy Lodge

Team C+D: Backcountry Wound Care, Craig Warden and Ashley Weisman, Fanning Hall

4pm-6pm

Team A+B: Ultrasound in the Austere Environment, Justin Grisham, Fanning Hall

Team C: Assessing and Moving the Injured Patient Laurel Lodge

Team D: Assessing and Moving the Injured Patient Cy Lodge

6pm

Burrito Banquet, Fanning Hall

7:30pm-8:30pm

Avalanche on Everest, Emily Johnston, Fanning Hall

8:30pm

Saturday Night Social: Arc’teryx Silent Auction and Merch Giveaway / More Beers and Splints, Fanning Hall


SUNDAY

7am-8am

Breakfast, Fanning Hall

8am-10am

Group A - Scenario 1, Rec Area Alpha

Group B - Scenario 1, Rec Area Beta

Group C - Scenario 2, Rec Area Kappa

Group D - Scenario 2, Rec Area Delta

10am-12pm

Group C - Scenario 1, Rec Area Alpha

Group D - Scenario 1, Rec Area Beta

Group A - Scenario 2, Rec Area Kappa

Group B - Scenario 2, Rec Area Delta

12pm

Group Picture and End-of-Conference Announcements, Fanning Hall

1pm

Checkout & HIT THE SLOPES


Adaptation to Hypoxia, Emily Johnston

This talk focuses on the pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of conditions that may present at high altitude. After this in depth talk, you will understand the difference between normobaric and hypobaric hypoxia, the cellular level response to hypoxia, the organismal adaptation to hypoxia by organ system with particular emphasis on pulmonary and metabolic adaptation. You will learn about acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema.

ALS in the Backcountry, CJ Svela

You’ve located the avalanche-buried ski partner; now what? Learn more about assessment, stabilization, and evacuation principles in the backcountry for how to get the injured out and on their way to definitive care.

Climbing Medicine, J. Pearce Beissinger

Define “climbing medicine” and discuss the epidemiology, recognition, and management of climbing injuries, as well as principles of evacuation and what the future looks like for the field.

Cold Related Injuries, Derrick Sorweide

This talk will cover: chill blains, trench foot, frost nip, frost bite, sunburn, snow blindness, Reynaud’s, dehydration, calorie expenditure, blisters, cold related secondary burns, and other altitude-related injuries.

Glacier Travel, Stewart Decker

Learn crevasse identification and how to: avoid falling into one, not all die when somebody falls into one, and rescue techniques to get your teammate out. This lecture will include hands-on practice with essential knots for glacier travel and rescue.

High Altitude Medicine, Andrew Luks

People traveling to high altitude on either a personal trip or in a professional capacity as the medical point-person need to know how to recognize and manage the primary forms of acute altitude illness. This talk will review the main physiologic response to acute hypoxia and the manifestations in healthy individuals at high altitude, identify high altitude travelers with any of the three major forms of acute altitude illness and outline treatment strategies for individuals with acute altitude illness.

Hypothermia Recognition, Physiology, and Management, Anna Condino

Understand the pathophysiology of the different stages of accidental hypothermia. You’ll learn the types of heat loss and how to prevent and address them, signs and symptoms of accidental hypothermia, principles of prevention and management of hypothermia from a wilderness medicine perspective and discuss prehospital management and triage for severely hypothermic patients and hypothermic avalanche victims.

Introduction to Basic Wilderness Medicine Principles and Practice, Bill Hatch

Creating a wilderness medical kit and defining its contents is not as easy as it may seem. When creating a personal wilderness medical kit one needs to consider multiple factors such as available resources, how much do you want or need to carry, and how much discomfort are you willing to endure prior to receiving definitive care. The intent of today’s presentation is not to provide a check-off list of what you need to carry in a kit. Rather you will be guided through several considerations and thought processes intended to help you as you create your kit based upon activity-related predictable injury patterns.

Landing Zone Safety Training, Holly Ilg

You will learn aircraft information and capabilities, about the medical crew, how to choose a landing zone, safe operations, communication with the aircraft, and more!

Mass Casualty Incident in the Wilderness, Dwight Smith

Your bus with 20 fellow residents, faculty and family has just rolled over a small cliff on a remote road in the wilderness. Multiple minor to major injuries. EMS will take 1-2 hours to get there. What now? Learn the principles of a mass casualty incident in the wilderness.

Medical Care for Common Ski Injuries, Carlton Heine

Learn about the history of skiing and the injuries that came out of it’s early days, the development of the National Ski Patrol, and discuss common injuries for contemporary skiers, snowboarders, and Nordic skiers.

Survivor Personalities and Resiliency, Stewart Decker

Learn pearls from survivors on how to survive terrible situations and develop an understanding of desirable personality traits for survival.

West Coast Snake Envenomations: From Fangs to Fibrin to Fangs, Brittany Arnold

From fangs to fibrin to fangs! You will get an overview of venomous snakes/envenomations on the West Coast, learn how to care for the snakebite victim in the backcountry, the clinical presentations of snakebite envenomations, history of anti-venom use and the current/future anti-venom use and implications.